GlitchSort

GlitchSort is a Processing application that uses interrupted pixel-sorting to create glitchy images. Since it has found an audience among glitch artists, I’m setting up this page as a point from which to download a current version and reference materials, as these become available. I’ll also post news or links to news about GlitchSort here.

GlitchSort 1.0b10, for Processing 2.0, is available as of June 7, 2013: GlitchSort_v01b10.zip. Processing 2.0 fixes the image memory leak that plagued previous releases. Note that GlitchSort for Processing 2.0 requires ControlP5 2.0.4, which is not bundled with the Processing application (it is bundled with the standalone applications).

There are bundled applications for Windows32, Windows64, MacOSX, Linux32 and Linux64: YMMV as far as running these. If you have Java installed, they should run, but I have only tested them on MacOS.

The bundled documentation is for version 0.1b8, but I describe new features below and in the source code.  Here is a higher resolution version of the manual (33M PDF) with much better image quality. The print version (60M PDF) offers the highest resolution, for printing. Online reference manual can be viewed here (1.6M PDF). Download or view the optimized high resolution version (33M PDF) here. Very high resolution print version (61.5M PDF) here.

GlitchSort2 Manual Cover

GlitchSort2 Manual Cover

Version 1.0b10 adds commands that use capital letters (shift key + key). These change the behavior of the save, revert, open and turn 90° commands. See the changes.txt file or comments in the code for details. 1.0b10 also allows you to set a percentage of zigzag sorting.

GlitchSort 1.0b9, the last version for Processing 1.5.1, is available here: GlitchSort_v01b9.

Version 1.0b9 revised the zigzag sorting by providing check boxes to set zigzag sorting to random angles, aligned angles,  or angles permuted in blocks of four. It also adds the scaledLowPass method, a low pass filter on each RGB channel with a different FFT block size (64, 32, 16) for each channel. The component order depends on current Component Sorting Order setting, when the RGB channels are used. If you are using HSB channels, a random RGB order will be selected.  Currently this command is only triggered by the ‘)’ (right parenthesis) key command. It works best when pixel dimension are multiples of 64. After it executes, you can immediately use the statistical FFT command (‘k’) to sharpen the image. Amazingly, most of the detail that was lost with the low pass filtering will be restored by the default statistical FFT setting (set by the command to operate on 16 x 16 pixel blocks). The command takes time to execute because it’s really a long series of commands bundled together. It was an experiment that proved very rich in the variety of images it could create. Here’s an example.

Version 1.0b8a fixed the denoise command to handle edge and corner pixels correctly, and changed the ‘_’ (underscore) hack to repeat the last command four times, with a 90 degree rotation between executions, when last command is in “gl<>9kjdGLKJD”.

Version 1.0b7, a substantial update, supported Fast Fourier Transforms on images. It also saves JPEGs using current Java libraries, instead of the deprecated com.sun.image.codec.jpeg. Version 1.0b8 fixes a bug in the audify command, and adds a “denoise” filter and spatial shifting of color channels: that was enough to justify the new version number. I discussed GlitchSort version 1.0b7 pre-release on December 7, at a Share Session at GLi.TC/H.

Version 01b5, released on August 23, 2012, was the first public release named  “GlitchSort” instead of “GlitchSort2.” Version 01b5 provided a new sorting tool that operates on zigzag-scanned blocks of pixels using any of the available algorithms, and a color quantizing tool.

Version 1.0b4, released on August 1, 2012, offered four different sorting algorithms, each of which has a different behavior that can be used to affect images in different ways. It added the “munge” feature that does glitchy compositing, and the “degrade” command that uses JPEG compression to degrade an image.

My own images created with GlitchSort can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ignotus/sets/72157629445337238/.