Fools Paradise Links

Fool’s Paradise is a virtual world based on the “Proverbs of Hell” of English poet and artist William Blake. Intermedia data structures inform its visual and musical composition, developed in collaboration between artist Paul Hertz and composer Stephen Dembski. Visually, Fools Paradise riffs on English Romantic gardens and the changing aesthetics of VR, from the CAVE to game engines and goggles. The virtual world offers forty-eight interactive pavilions linked by a network of paths. Each pavilion interprets a proverb as a song composed by Stephen Dembski for soprano, flute, cello, and spoken voice, as a mask (by Mark Klink), and as calligraphy (by Koy Suntichotinun).

Online resources for Fools Paradise II:

Paper from the proceedings of the xCoAx Conference in Madrid, 2018:
http://2018.xcoax.org/pdf/xCoAx2018-Hertz.pdf

Description of Fools Paradise at Radiance.org:
https://www.radiancevr.co/artists/paul-hertz/

Video screen capture, 2018:
https://vimeo.com/275872073

Video short of Fools Paradise I, live musical performance and VR, 2004:
https://youtu.be/1eA9LosAXyI

Flickr album covering the development of Fools Paradise:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ignotus/albums/72157662974244038

Ignotheory generative system:
http://paulhertz.net/worksonpaper/pages/ignotheo.html

Dick Higgins’ essay on Intermedia:
HTML    PDF

William Blake, The Marriage of  Heaven and Hell, 1790.
http://www.blakearchive.org/work/mhh

Videos of visual music, a form of intermedia:

Center for Visual Music
http://www.centerforvisualmusic.org/

Làslò Moholy Nagy, Light Space Modulator (1930):
https://youtu.be/fNt39WJQqjg

Oskar Fischinger, An Optical Poem (1938):
https://youtu.be/_kTbt07DZZA

Mary Ellen Bute, Synchromy Number 4: Escape (1938):
https://youtu.be/YRmu-GcClls

Norman McLaren, Begone, Dull Care (1949)
https://youtu.be/svD0CWVjYRY

Jordan Belson, Allures (1961):
https://youtu.be/SJ04bI39510

John Whitney, Arabesque (1975):
https://youtu.be/w7h0ppnUQhE

Vibeke Sorensen, NLoops (1989):
https://vimeo.com/89483425

Jack Ox, VR visualization of “Im Januar am Nil,” music by Clarence Barlow:
https://vimeo.com/18257786

Other resources

A blog from 2008 about intermedia, edited by Jack Ox and Paul Hertz:
http://www.paulhertz.net/intermedia/
http://www.paulhertz.net/intermedia/toolkit/

Semiotic Temporal Units at the Laboratoire Musique et Informatique de Marseille:
http://www.labo-mim.org/eng/index.php?2008/10/14/10-ust

(/’fu:bar) expo in Zagreb

In Zagreb, Croatia, Siva Galerija recently presented (/’fu:bar), an exhibition of international and local artists involved with glitch art.  Works were collected via email and exhibited either as projections or as prints created on site. Here is the complete list of exhibiting artists. Several of my works were exhibited, including Situation Room, which was printed out for the occasion.

Situation Room at (/’fu:bar) 2015, Zagreb, Croatia

Situation Room (Paul Hertz, 2014) digital image based on “Obama and Biden await updates on bin Laden,” May 1, 2011, official White House photo by Pete Souza. Exhibition photo, at Siva Galerija, 2015, Zagreb, Croatia

This is clearly a new way of doing exhibitions, using digital materials that can be exhibited as media or as hard copy, with practically no intervention by the artist save for submitting work or giving permission. Where works are tagged with one of the various FLOSS licenses, even permission may be superfluous. You could be putting up your own show of FLOSS right now and totally ignoring the artists and it would be entirely legal (to the extent that FLOSS licenses are legal contracts). It is worth noting that the organizers of (/’fu:bar), though occasionally slow to send out notices, seem to have contacted all the artists and sent them exhibition photos. This courtesy of notifying the artist about exhibition and publication of their work and providing documentation where possible is a critical part of the Open Source ethic, it seems to me, and deserves to be mentioned in the various licenses. It may currently be an unwritten rule that not everyone cares to observe—or it may just be wishful thinking. More on that later. Meanwhile, I am pleased to have been included in this exhibition, and doubly so to have received documentation back.

SPAMM Cupcake

SPAMM Cupcake is an online show of new media art curated by Ellectra Radikal and Systaime Alias Michaël Borras that was streamed live for the week of Feb. 28–Mar 5, 2013, to a storefront at the corner of Bowery and Kenmare streets in Manhattan, at the invitation of Mark Brown. Ellectra instigated a few months of conversation on FaceBook and eventually some 50 artists participated. The video for my work Snapper is shown here (thanks to Steve Stoppert for the videos, and to Dafna Ganani for making them available on FB). You can find the original animated GIF on the SPAMM Cupcake site, of course, and in my portfolio page of GIFs. Snapper is a work in my recent series on glitch and social memory. Some still images can be viewed on my Glitch Nation page. SPAMM Cupcake has several sites on Facebook, including its group page, the New York City event page and a new page documenting Cupcake.

The events and documents and chats have been flowing so furiously I have barely had time to check out all the works at SPAMM Cupcake. I’m posting this as a way of gathering the documentation and declaring my intention to be a less involved with FB commentary about the show and more involved in experiencing the work in the show.

New Portfolio Pages

We are currently adding some new portfolio pages, starting with selections from Paul Hertz’s recent glitch works, Glitch Nation and Datascapes and Noisefields. We’re using some elegant code from Yair Even Or, a jQuery plug-in called Photobox, to provide a zoomable slide show of images. We will add new portfolios of work from Paul Hertz, Alma de la Serra and Darrell Luce, and possibly even from our mentor, J.T. Pescador, as time goes on.

Update: there’s a whole series of new portfolio pages, with a navigation menu: Glitch Nation, GIFs, Datascapes, Ornithology Suite, Field Studies, Tree Scrolls, Blue Noise.

Ponente Acquired by Block Museum

The Mary and Leigh Block Museum, home to a notable collection of digital prints, has acquired a print of Ponente, a recent algorithmic work by Paul Hertz. Ponente is one of the Sampling Patterns series of works exploring blue noise. Ponente is constructed from multiple layers of blue noise in varying scales and densities, altered by low frequency waves and coloring rules.

Algorithmically-generated image, Ponente

Ponente, 2011, archival inkjet print, 18 x 29 in.

Deadpan Acquired by Addison Gallery

In January 2013 the Addison Gallery of American Art acquired the first suite in the new edition of Paul Hertz’s suite of digital prints Deadpan, or, the Holy Toast. Printed at 16.2 x 14 inches on 22 x 17 inch Hahnemühle Photo Rag Paper in a limited edition of five portfolios plus two artist’s proof portfolios, this new edition reveals the full detail and complexity of the images. Prints are available individually or as a full portfolio. Please use our contact form for inquiries.

The master printer and Galapagos print

The master printer and Galapagos print

GlitchSort

GlitchSort is a Processing application that uses interrupted pixel-sorting to create glitchy images. Since it has found an audience among glitch artists, I’m setting up this page as a point from which to download a current version and reference materials, as these become available. I’ll also post news or links to news about GlitchSort here.

GlitchSort 1.0b10, for Processing 2.0, is available as of June 7, 2013: GlitchSort_v01b10.zip. Processing 2.0 fixes the image memory leak that plagued previous releases. Note that GlitchSort for Processing 2.0 requires ControlP5 2.0.4, which is not bundled with the Processing application (it is bundled with the standalone applications).

There are bundled applications for Windows32, Windows64, MacOSX, Linux32 and Linux64: YMMV as far as running these. If you have Java installed, they should run, but I have only tested them on MacOS.

The bundled documentation is for version 0.1b8, but I describe new features below and in the source code.  Here is a higher resolution version of the manual (33M PDF) with much better image quality. The print version (60M PDF) offers the highest resolution, for printing. Online reference manual can be viewed here (1.6M PDF). Download or view the optimized high resolution version (33M PDF) here. Very high resolution print version (61.5M PDF) here.

GlitchSort2 Manual Cover

GlitchSort2 Manual Cover

Version 1.0b10 adds commands that use capital letters (shift key + key). These change the behavior of the save, revert, open and turn 90° commands. See the changes.txt file or comments in the code for details. 1.0b10 also allows you to set a percentage of zigzag sorting.

GlitchSort 1.0b9, the last version for Processing 1.5.1, is available here: GlitchSort_v01b9.

Version 1.0b9 revised the zigzag sorting by providing check boxes to set zigzag sorting to random angles, aligned angles,  or angles permuted in blocks of four. It also adds the scaledLowPass method, a low pass filter on each RGB channel with a different FFT block size (64, 32, 16) for each channel. The component order depends on current Component Sorting Order setting, when the RGB channels are used. If you are using HSB channels, a random RGB order will be selected.  Currently this command is only triggered by the ‘)’ (right parenthesis) key command. It works best when pixel dimension are multiples of 64. After it executes, you can immediately use the statistical FFT command (‘k’) to sharpen the image. Amazingly, most of the detail that was lost with the low pass filtering will be restored by the default statistical FFT setting (set by the command to operate on 16 x 16 pixel blocks). The command takes time to execute because it’s really a long series of commands bundled together. It was an experiment that proved very rich in the variety of images it could create. Here’s an example.

Version 1.0b8a fixed the denoise command to handle edge and corner pixels correctly, and changed the ‘_’ (underscore) hack to repeat the last command four times, with a 90 degree rotation between executions, when last command is in “gl<>9kjdGLKJD”.

Version 1.0b7, a substantial update, supported Fast Fourier Transforms on images. It also saves JPEGs using current Java libraries, instead of the deprecated com.sun.image.codec.jpeg. Version 1.0b8 fixes a bug in the audify command, and adds a “denoise” filter and spatial shifting of color channels: that was enough to justify the new version number. I discussed GlitchSort version 1.0b7 pre-release on December 7, at a Share Session at GLi.TC/H.

Version 01b5, released on August 23, 2012, was the first public release named  “GlitchSort” instead of “GlitchSort2.” Version 01b5 provided a new sorting tool that operates on zigzag-scanned blocks of pixels using any of the available algorithms, and a color quantizing tool.

Version 1.0b4, released on August 1, 2012, offered four different sorting algorithms, each of which has a different behavior that can be used to affect images in different ways. It added the “munge” feature that does glitchy compositing, and the “degrade” command that uses JPEG compression to degrade an image.

My own images created with GlitchSort can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ignotus/sets/72157629445337238/.

Video TurtleBoids Demo

Video TurtleBoids Demo Applet

Video TurtleBoids Demo Applet

The Video TurtleBoids Demo Applet is a Processing applet that captures video, derives optical flow vectors from it, and then uses the vectors to change the velocity of a flock of “boids” that can also draw lines (i.e., behave like Logo turtles). You will need the IgnoCodeLib library (the .jar file is included in the Code directory) and the ControlP5 library (not included, available for download at http://www.sojamo.de/libraries/controlP5/)

Based on Flocking, by Daniel Shiffman, in The Nature of Code, a demonstration of Craig Reynolds’ steering behaviors (see also http://www.red3d.com/cwr/). Also adapts code from Optical Flow by Hidetoshi Shimodaira from http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/10435.

Download the VideoBoidsDemo. It will not run in a browser, and it does require a video input to function.